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RCTS made great strides during the 1960s.  The academic, athletic, and cultural programs of the school were a source of pride for the Black community in Randolph County.  The physical plant of the school saw the construction of a new gymnasium, an elementary school annex, and the conversion of the furnace that heated the school from a coal fired to a natural gas fired system.  The front and rear parking lots were paved and a new athletic field was constructed on the south side of the main school building. A lunch room was constructed by converting part of the auditorium, finally providing hot lunches to RCTS students.

The future of RCTS became uncertain during the latter part of the decade due to the calls for school desegregation from the Black community and from the U.S. Federal Courts.  Though most RCTS Bulldogs did not relish the idea of leaving their friends and teachers at RCTS to attend the previously all-white Handley High, Knight-Enloe Elementary, Wadley, Woodland, and Randolph County High Schools, and Rock Mills and Wedowee Elementary Schools, some were nevertheless selected to enroll in those schools beginning in 1968.  RCTS closed its doors in 1970 immediately after the graduation of its last senior class.

Some Black teachers and administrators were assigned to previously all-white schools.  Many were not, and had to seek positions in neighboring school systems in Georgia and other locations in Alabama.